What time do clocks go back TONIGHT? Everything you need to know about Daylight Savings

Windsor Castle worker discusses process of turning back clocks

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Each year the clocks change twice, forwards in the spring and backwards in autumn. In autumn these changes mean darker nights and colder days as the clocks go from British Summer Time (BST) to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). So what time exactly do the clocks change?

For some autumn arrives when the leaves change colour and colder weather arrives.

Another key indication of the seasons changing for some is the clocks going backwards by an hour.

This means we gain an hour of sleep, however, evenings will get darker quicker.

This year the clocks will go backwards by an hour in the early hours of Sunday, October 31.

Read More: When the clocks go back is it darker in the mornings?

What time do the clocks go back TONIGHT?

The clocks will go backwards at 2am, switching to 1am.

The nights will steadily get longer after Sunday, with the longest night of the year falling on December 21.

This is also known as the winter solstice – and will see the shortest number of daylight hours of the year.

The clocks will then go forward again in Spring 2022, on Sunday, March 27.

A good saying to remember which way round this happens is “Spring forward, fall back”.

Why do the clocks change?

Brits experience changes to the clocks in order to make the most of the daylight.

The campaign to change the clocks was started more than 100 years ago by British builder William Willett.

His campaign – beginning in 1907 – was aimed at reducing the valuable daylight hours being wasted in the summer months.

The change would also help conserve fuel during wartime.

However the Summer Time Act bringing this into force was not enacted until 1916, unfortunately, something William never got to see.

Sleep experts at eachnight.com have given their top tips for coping with the clocks changing.

Expert Jasmine Lee said tonight taking a warm bath or shower to aid sleep will be crucial.

She explained: “One trick is to move your bedtime forward or back in increments over a few days.

“These schedule shifts help you gradually become accustomed to the new bedtime you’ll have when daylight savings takes effect.

“We also recommend practising good sleep hygiene, which includes regular exercise, limited caffeine consumption, and a consistent daily routine.

“Sleepers may also want to take a warm bath or shower in the evening the night of the change.

“Though it may sound like a paradox, soaking in warm water can help your body cool down in preparation for sleep.”

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