Coronavirus UK latest news: Brits face Turkey quarantine fears as 29 hotspots at risk of lockdown and deaths hit 41,361

BRITS face an anxious wait to see if the air bridge to Turkey will remain in place.

The popular holiday destination has seen a spike in cases and could be the latest to be placed on the quarantine list.

It comes just a day after many holidaymakers scrambled to return to the UK from France, Malta and the Netherlands.

Should Turkey join other countries like Spain and Belgium on the list, those returning will need to quarantine for 14 days.

Meanwhile, a total of 29 areas have been named by Public Health England on their latest watch list of coronavirus hotspots.

Special measures are already in place at 21 ‘areas of intervention’, while eight places are named as ‘areas of concern’ where local lockdown measures could be implemented next.

The death toll rose in the UK on Saturday, with 41,361 people dying due to the coronavirus in Britain.

Follow our coronavirus live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • RUSSIA REPORTS NEARLY 5,000 NEW CASES

    Russia reported 4,969 new cases of coronavirus on Sunday, bringing its nationwide tally to 922,853.

    The country now has the fourth highest caseload in the world.

  • DEADLINES MISSED

    Thousands of Brits were left fuming on Saturday after missing the last ferries out of France before the new 14-day quarantine rule came into force.

    One group managed to charter a fishing boat to get home as massive tailbacks formed heading to the Channel Tunnel and the ferry ports.

    But another family missed the 4am deadline as they were refused entry to a boat because their dog’s passport had the wrong stamp.

    Some 160,000 Brits attempted the last-minute return because France had been taken off the UK Government’s safe list following a spike in coronavirus cases there.

    But many were left stranded as tickets home quickly sold out or rocketed in price.

  • COVID ORIGIN

    Covid-19 may have originated in a Chinese mineshaft in 2012 – not a wet market in Wuhan.

    Scientists believe the devastating virus, that has killed over 760,000 people worldwide, actually began 1,000 miles away from Wuhan's shamed wet market.

    Eight years ago, six miners in the Mojiang mine in southwestern China's Yunnan province fell ill with a pneumonia-like illness after spending 14 days removing bat faeces.

    Tragically, three workers died from the illness.

    Physician Li Xu, who treated the miners, describes how the patients had a high fever, a dry cough, sore limbs and, in some cases, headaches — all symptoms now associated with COVID-19, said Virologist Jonathan Latham and molecular biologist Allison Wilson.

  • CHECK YOUR HOLIDAY DESTINATION

    France, Malta and The Netherlands have been added to the quarantine list this week.

    Here is the full list of 155 countries that you must quarantine after visiting as well as all the rules around it.

    Travellers must self-isolate for two weeks upon returning from any of the countries on the quarantine list.

    If a country stays above 20 cases per 100,000 people for more than seven days it is likely to be added to the UK’s quarantine list.

    Passengers must leave their details with border officials, go straight home and self-quarantine for two weeks to stop the spread of coronavirus.

  • PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND SCRAPPED

    The health quango blamed for the poor handling of the pandemic will be scrapped next month, it was revealed.

    Matt Hancock has decided that Public Health England will be wound up after a string of failures.

    The Health Secretary has ordered a major shake-up following heavy criticism of its failure to prepare for the spread of coronavirus with stocks of protective gear and testing equipment.

    Its officials have been accused of spending too much time lecturing the public on eating and drinking habits instead of preparing to protect against a looming pandemic.

    Mr Hancock will this week announce a merger of PHE with NHS Test and Trace – to form a new body called the National Institute for Health Protection.

  • SCHOOLS ARE SAFE

    Ministers are launching a new drive to persuade parents in England that it will be safe for their children to return to the classroom in September.

    The backtoschoolsafely campaign will highlight the measures being put in place to minimise the risk of coronavirus transmission.

    With most pupils having been away from the classroom since March, the move comes amid concerns from some families about the potential risks when children start the new term.

    The campaign – involving newspaper, digital, radio and billboard adverts – will emphasise the importance of organised learning to children's development.

    It will point to guidance, endorsed by Public Health England, to ensure schools are Covid-secure – including staggered break times, increased hygiene and hand-washing and keeping pupils in consistent groups.

    At the same time, staff and pupils are being encouraged to walk or cycle to school whenever possible.

  • HEATHROW LAUNCHES £150 CORONAVIRUS TESTS

    Heathrow will offer coronavirus tests for £150 to those returning from quarantine countries in a bid to pressure ministers out of the 14 day quarantines.

    Terminal Two will see the first testing centre trialled this week.

    The test will take 90 seconds to perform, then return results 7 hours later. They will then take a follow-up test at home five to eight days later, with the results within 72 hours.

    The tests are already in use in more than 30 countries, allowing passengers to avoid isolating if they test negative.

    Britain has been accused by travel bosses and MPs of being “hopelessly slow” at approving airport testing that has been standard practise in many European countries.

  • 'IT'S UNLIKELY THAT WE WILL RETURN'

    Queensland’s Chief Health Officer, Dr Jeannette Young, has written that “it's unlikely that we will return to life as we knew it” in an op ed with The Courier Mail.

    The top doc praised Queenslanders' “brilliant” response to the pandemic, saying: “Because of you, we are enduring this pandemic far better than most jurisdictions, not only in Australia, but around the world.

    “Our COVID-19 tally remains at 1091 and we currently only have nine active cases.” she noted.

    However in spite of praising how well the area has done, she encouraged her fellow Ausies to stay careful – “it only takes one match to ignite a bushfire, it only takes one infection to trigger an outbreak.”

  • TURKEY COULD BE NEXT TO BE KNOCKED OFF TRAVEL CORRIDOR LIST

    A rise in cases in Turkey has prompted fears that it could join Spain, France and Holland on the UK's quarantine list.

    The country had its highest daily number of cases since June today, with 1,256 positive tests and 21 deaths.

    There are currently 18.5 infections per 100,000 people, a rise on the 15.8 recorded last month.

    The list will be monitored carefully over the coming weeks, with Boris saying that he will not hesitate to impose quarantine measures on countries.

    Fears Turkey could be next holiday destination to go onto UK quarantine list as country sees new virus spike

  • CASES IN CHILDREN 'STEADILY INCREASING'

    Coronavirus cases in children are “steadily increasing” according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    The number and rate of cases in children across the United States have been “steadily increasing from March to July,” the CDC revealed in its updated guidelines on Friday.

    Experts have found that children (up until 17 years old) make up 7.3 percent of all cases in the US – and children comprise 22 percent of the country's population.

    “Recent evidence suggests that children likely have the same or higher viral loads in their nasopharynx compared with adults and that children can spread the virus effectively in households and camp settings,” the CDC further explains.

    The findings suggest “that children may have less severe illness from COVID-19 compared to adults.”

    Many children will be returning to school in the coming weeks, prompting fears that they could spread the disease if they do not socially distance.

    More on this here

  • 9/11 COMMEMORATION TO GO AHEAD IN NEW YORK

    This year's 9/11 light display will go ahead, but with extra health precautions, Governor Andrew Cuomo has said.

    “This year it is especially important that we all appreciate and commemorate 9/11, the lives lost and the heroism displayed as New Yorkers are once again called upon to face a common enemy,” he said in a statement.

  • HERE'S HOW QUARANTINE RULES ARE BEING ENFORCED IN THE UK

    The quarantine is being run and enforced by Border Force, cops, and Public Health England officials.

    If returning to the UK from a country on the quarantine list, you will need to provide details of your journey and contact details BEFORE you travel.

    Those rules continue to apply for the time being – both to Brits returning to the country and tourists arriving from abroad.

    Anyone entering the country must provide contact details and then self-isolate for 14 days, or face a fine of up to £1,000.

    Police are conducting checks to ensure people are quarantining and not leaving their residence for the two-week period.

    Brits living in the UK can quarantine at their own home, but they are not allowed to leave the house for a fortnight.

    Anyone without accommodation should be provided with alternative living space by the government.

  • 'WE'VE DONE IT RIGHT'

    President Trump told reporters today “we've done it right” regarding the US battle against Covid-19 and that the country, that currently has more deaths than any other, is doing “very well”.

    He also claimed that there has been a “steep decline” in cases across the US this week.

    Over the past week, there have been an average of 53,083 cases per day, a decrease of 17 percent from the average two weeks earlier, according to the New York Times.

    The US currently has 5,348,556 cases and 169,336 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

    This means that 1 in 4 people who have tested positive (25.1 per cent) and one in five that have died (22 per cent) from coronavirus globally is living in the US.

  • BRAZIL RECORDS 41,576 CASES AND 709 DEATHS

    Brazil's health ministry has confirmed 41,576 new daily cases and 709 deaths due to the novel coronavirus.

    The country now has 107,232 deaths and 3,317,096 confirmed cases, according to Reuters.

  • RUSSIA PRODUCES FIRST BATCH OF NEW CORONAVIRUS VACCINE

    Russia has produced the first batch of its new “Sputnik V” vaccine for COVID-19 just hours after the health ministry reported the start of manufacturing, Interfax agency reports.

    In spite of international concern among the scientific community, Russia has said the vaccine, the first for the coronavirus to go into production, will be rolled out by the end of this month.

    The country has decided to go into production after allegedly skipping Phase III trials of thousands of participants, normally considered essential precursors for a vaccine to secure regulatory approval.

    Russia's top respiratory doctor has quit over the rushed rollout, citing safety concerns.

    President Vladimir Putin has assured the public that it is safe, adding that one of his daughters had taken it as a volunteer and felt good afterwards.

    Moscow’s Gamaleya Institute, which developed the vaccine, said previously that Russia would be producing about 5 million doses a month by December-January, Interfax said.

  • MAJORITY WOULD ACCEPT LOCKDOWN MEASURES IF NO VACCINE IS FOUND

    Research from King's College London and Ipsos MORI shows that the vast majority, 87 per cent, of people would accept home schooling, local lockdowns, bans on live audiences and choosing where to work from being imposed in the future.

    More stats from the 2,237 participant survey of UK residents conducted July 17 to 20:

    • 85 per cent said they would accept their own local area being subject to local lockdown restrictions.
    • 68 per cent said they would accept a ban on major sporting or cultural events with a live audience
    • 47 per cent of people said they would accept employees having to return to their workplace according to Government instruction while 39 per cent said they would find that unacceptable.
    • 49 per cent of people said long-term homeschooling would be acceptable
    • Less than a third of people (29 per cent) feel they are certain or likely to face significant financial difficulties after furlough ends.

    TICKETS HIKED AS BRITS SCRAMBLE TO GET HOME

    British tourists in France were being charged around the same as a return to Australia (£649 with BA) to get them home before quarantine restrictions were imposed.

    British Airways hiked fares up to nine times for passengers returning from the south of France.

    The final seats on its afternoon and evening flights from Nice to London were costing €727 and €854 – compared to €102 for passengers flying next Monday, a kayak.co.uk search showed.

    DFDS Seaways doubled fares for ferry passengers sailing from Calais to Dover yesterday, with two passengers and one car costing £196, compared to the £109 next week, a directferries.com search showed.

    P&O ferries had availability yesterday evening – but prices were at least £200 a car, rather than £90 on normal days. 

    The lowest priced Eurostar tickets available on Friday morning were £210.

    PHE TO BE SCRAPPED

    Matt Hancock is to announce that Public Health England will be scrapped and replaced by a specialised body aimed at protecting England against coronavirus and other pandemics, The Telegraph reports.

    The new body, called the National Institute for Health Protection, will see the pandemic response arm of PHE merged with the NHS Test and Trace programme.

    ELITE SEX CLUB RETURNS WITH RAPID COVID TESTING

    An elite New York sex club, Snctm, has reopened with rapid Covid-19 testing for VIP guests, staff and performers.

    The secret society will host the first in series of erotic events on a date to be confirmed next month, with tickets priced at an eye-watering $3,750.

    The private members' club, which has been known to attract A list celebrities, has become known for hosting parties in cities from Moscow to Miami offering guests the chance to realise their wildest sexual fantasies.

    Read the Sun's exclusive on it here.

    FOUR PUBS CLOSE AFTER CUSTOMERS AND STAFF TEST POSITIVE

    Four pubs in Stanley, County Durham, have been closed after an outbreak.

    Customers of The Stanley Empire Club, Phoenix Club, The Ball Alley and East Stanley Working Men’s Club are now being traced by NHS officials according to ChronicleLive.

    County Durham’s Director of Public Health, Amanda Healy, has issued an urgent plea for anyone who visited the pubs on those dates to self-isolate.

    Anyone who visited Stanley Empire Bar on August 9, 10, or 11 is being asked to self-isolate after customers tested positive.

    SPAS AND JACUZZIS REOPEN

    Spas, Jacuzzis, and pools have reopened, as long as social distancing is in place, but saunas and steam rooms are still off-limits in England.

    Government advice remains that they “should stay out of use for the time being as the risk of transmission is unclear”.

    The latest advice adds: “Spas should keep saunas and steam rooms closed until further notice”.

    Leisure centres were permitted to reopen from 25 July.

    Saunas and steam rooms in England were set follow suit on August 1 but Boris Johnson confirmed last month that they must remain closed after a rise in coronavirus cases.

    On July 31 he announced the Government had postponed the further easing of lockdown measures for specific grassroots sport, gym and leisure facilities.

    Wet treatments in spas, such as saunas, steam rooms and hydrotherapy pools have been permitted in Northern Ireland since July 24.

    Many businesses, including Spabreaks.com, are campaigning for the same in England, Scotland and Wales.

    SCOTLAND MARKS A MONTH OF NO CONFIRMED CORONAVIRUS DEATHS

    No one in Scotland has died of coronavirus since July 15, meaning the country has gone a whole month without any covid deaths.

    The Scottish government confirmed that 51 people tested positive today.

    244 patients remain in hospital suffering from the virus, the lowest since figures were first published on March 27.

    The number of deaths in Scotland remains at 2,491, while a total of 19,289 people have now tested positive for the virus.

    P&O 'GHOST SHIP' CAPTAIN SHARES PICS OF ABANDONED VESSEL

    Captain Marcin Banach has shared photos of his life aboard the deserted P&O Azura cruise ship, that would normally carry 3,000 passengers and 1,000 staff.

    The ship is currently sitting tight off the coast of Devon while it waits for permission to start operating again November 12, 2020.

    Marcin has been sharing his daily life with his Twitter followers.

    He shared a snap of himself working out in a totally empty gym – an unusual sight for a cruise ship in August.

    Another showed him wrapped up in dust sheets or strolling around the deck to keep fit.

    Captain of ‘ghost ship’ P&O cruise liner shares pics from empty vessel abandoned by passengers & crew off coast of Devon

    SOUTH AFRICA LIFTS LOCKDOWN RESTRICTIONS

    South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has announced a sweeping removal of lockdown restrictions on the economy after declaring that the country has moved beyond the peak.

    The SA government will now end the ban on alcohol and tobacco, allow restaurants and taverns to return to normal business, subject to strict hygiene regulations, and remove the ban on travel between provinces from midnight on Monday.

    Ramaphosa said: “All indications are that South Africa has reached the peak and moved beyond the inflection point of the curve.”

    SA imposed one of the world’s toughest lockdowns early on in its fight yet saw a surge in coronavirus infections that left it with the fifth highest number of cases in the world — currently around 579,000, of whom around 11,500 have died.

    The economy is in tatters, with millions of South Africans living in extreme poverty, according to Reuters.

    TWO IN FIVE ADULTS DISAPPROVE OF GOVERNMENT'S A-LEVEL HANDLING

    A new poll has shown that 42 per cent of English voters disapprove of the way the government has handled A-Level and GCSE results.

    Only 5 per cent of people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland think exam results given by algorithm should stand as actual results.

    The poll also found that:

    • 43 per cent of respondents believe pupils should be allowed to appeal to use their teacher's estimate instead
    • 43 per cent believe they should be allowed to simply sit the exam as intended
    • 39 per cent believe they should be allowed to appeal to use their mock exam results instead

    60 per cent of the public said they would prefer pubs and restaurants to shut in September if it means schools can re-open.

    The poll by Opinium approached 2,005 UK adults between August 13 and 14.

    Source: Read Full Article

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