Pubs face shortage of premium lager including Birra Moretti and Amstel

Pubs face BEER shortage of premium lager including Birra Moretti and Amstel as brewers are forced to limit deliveries to cope with huge demand after lockdown was eased

  • Huge demand for draught beer in first fortnight of outdoor hospitality reopening
  • Industry sources say Moretti’s owner Heineken is now limiting UK pub orders
  • They can only get three kegs per week going forward to cope with supply issues
  • More than ten million adults have returned to pubs in England since reopening

Pubs in Britain are facing a shortage of premium draught beer including Birra Moretti and Amstel amid huge demand in the first fortnight of outdoor hospitality reopening.

Industry sources revealed Moretti’s owner Heineken is now temporarily limiting UK pubs to ordering only three kegs per week going forward to cope with supply issues.

More than ten million adults have returned to pubs in England since they reopened outdoor spaces on April 12 with punters particularly keen to enjoy a draught pint.

Pub landlords warned that the beer shortage issues faced by some landlords are a ‘serious problem that is affecting their ability to trade efficiently and turn a profit’.

Heineken UK told MailOnline that demand had ‘totally surpassed our most optimistic forecasts’ and their breweries are ‘working round the clock’ to deal with the surge.

Groups of people enjoy a drink on a Saturday evening in London’s Soho over the weekend 


Pubs are facing a shortage of premium draught beer including Birra Moretti (left) and Amstel

It is a particular issue for the 2,500 Star Pubs & Bars owned by Heineken which is now offering them alternatives while increasing production of in-demand brands.

Alastair Kerr, regional representatives coordinator for the Campaign for Pubs, told MailOnline today that the supply issues were a ‘real shame’ for landlords.

You won’t need a Covid passport to visit a pub

Boris Johnson has shelved plans to introduce Covid passports in pubs and restaurants this summer.

The Prime Minister has shifted the focus of the controversial scheme away from the hospitality sector, Government sources have said.

Officials have been ordered to concentrate instead on devising a system that will enable foreign travel and the reopening of sectors like theatres, sports venues and nightclubs.

The move follows a furious backlash from Tory MPs and parts of the hospitality industry about the idea of forcing people to produce ‘papers for the pub’.

The PM floated the idea of extending a new ‘Covid certification scheme’ to the hospitality sector last month, saying it ‘should not be totally alien to us’. 

And officials suggested that venues deploying the policy could be allowed to relax social distancing rules in return. But with political opposition mounting and the virus in retreat, Mr Johnson is understood to be turning against the idea.

He said: ‘The beer shortage issues that are being faced my some publicans across the UK is a serious problem that is affecting their ability to trade efficiently and turn a profit.

‘Since reopening, pubs have faced an increase in demand from customers as many people flocked to pubs across the UK, so it is a real shame that some pubs are unable to stock some of their best selling products.

‘Pubs are struggling enough, with many opening on a financial loss and a beer shortage is the last thing they need. We hope that this is only a temporary problem.

‘It is essential that these pubs be able to get the beer that they desperately need, some of whom are contractually obliged to sell that particular product.

‘We also hope that the breweries that are facing a stock issue will be able to fulfil their orders and provide for their pubs that need to sell these beers.’

The data is even more surprising when data shows only 40 per cent of England’s pubs are open at the moment because the rest have insufficient outdoor space. 

Of those that are reopen outdoors, only about 20 per cent of their full space is available, so they do not have anywhere near the number of seats and tables as they would for a full reopening – and are therefore nowhere near capacity.

Indoor hospitality in England is set to be allowed from May 17, before it is hoped all Covid-19 restrictions will end on June 21.

Responding to the beer supply issues, a Heineken UK spokesman said today: ‘Over ten million adults in England have headed back to the great British pub, with many treating themselves to a much missed draught pint.

‘Demand for Birra Moretti and Amstel has totally surpassed our most optimistic forecasts, and our breweries are working round the clock to deal with this high level of demand.

People sit in a pub garden in Canonbury, North London, in the sunshine last Friday

Bar staff serve beer at the The Duke of Kent pub in London on the day it reopened, April 12

‘We are working with our customers to offer alternative beers from the extensive Heineken UK range of brands as we increase production.’

Shandy gets a hipster makeover: Craft brewers start making traditional drink to fuel the thirst for low alcohol beer as young people go teetotal 

Craft brewers are set to bring back 1970s favourite shandy post-pandemic to fuel the thirst for no or low alcohol beer as growing numbers of young people go teetotal.

Beer start-ups who are turning their hand to making so-called ‘nolo’ beverages are now giving shandy a fresh spin as demand for craft versions of the drink rise.

Sainsbury’s is set to begin selling craft brand Shandy Shack, based in Oxford, across its stores from next month, the Guardian reports.

It comes as sales of nolo beers rose by 30 per cent between 2016 and 2020 as nearly one in four 18-24-year-olds become teetotal to improve their health.

At £1.80 per can, Shandy Shack – which has a ‘elderflower lager top’ – reportedly promises a ‘punchy pilsner lager with a splash of crisp elderflower presse’ and have a 2.5 per cent alcohol by volume ratio.

Ed Stapleton, co-founder of Shandy Shack, said the company wanted shandy to reclaim its ‘rightful place as the country’s favourite low-alcohol drink’.

Heineken, which also produces Sol beer, has already said it expects sales to bounce back strongly thanks in-part to the reopening in the UK.

The Dutch brewer’s UK sales plunged by around 30 per cent in the first three months of 2021, compared to the same period in 2019.

Officials revealed last Friday that Britons should be able to ditch their face masks by the summer as Covid cases continue to plummet.

The country is on target for all legal coronavirus restrictions to be lifted on June 21, government scientists believe.

It follows a string of positive data showing that the reopening of pubs and shops has not led to a surge in cases, boosting hopes that normality is around the corner.

Pubs in Britain are facing a shortage of premium draught beer including Birra Moretti and Amstel amid huge demand in the first fortnight of outdoor hospitality reopening.

Industry sources revealed Moretti’s owner Heineken was now limiting UK pubs to ordering only three kegs per week on a temporary basis going forward.

Meanwhile Boris Johnson has shelved plans to introduce Covid passports in pubs and restaurants this summer, shifting the focus of the scheme away from hospitality. 

Officials have been ordered to concentrate instead on devising a system that will enable foreign travel and the reopening of sectors like theatres and sports venues.

The move follows a furious backlash from Tory MPs and parts of the hospitality industry about the idea of forcing people to produce ‘papers for the pub’. 

Pub group Shepherd Neame said some of its pubs clocked up record sales in the week they reopened, despite only being able to serve food and drink outdoors. 

Drinkers rushing back for their first pint pushed sales at the majority of the Kent-based chain’s 200 venues that reopened on April 12 in line with or above 2019 levels.

Boris Johnson (pictured in Hartlepool last Friday) has shelved plans to introduce Covid passports in pubs and restaurants this summer

Bosses said the performance showed there was lots of pent-up demand from customers desperate to get out and see friends and family. 

The hospitality sector is getting ready for a summer of staycations, which will see tens of billions of pounds diverted to UK high streets and tourist destinations.

Pubs in rural areas, in market towns and on the seaside are expecting a blistering summer as frustrated sun seekers flock to UK beauty spots.

Following the successful reopening, Wetherspoons said it would open more venues, adding another 44 pubs in England from April 26 to the 394 which opened last week.

Source: Read Full Article

You May Also Like